Another new function of the safe concerns a “prorgula” right. The original safe required the company to allow holders of safes to participate in the financing round after the financing round in which the safe was converted (for example. B if the safe is converted into series group preferred actuators, a secure holder – now holder of a Series A preferred share subseries – is allowed to acquire a proportionate portion of the Series B preferred share). While this concept is consistent with the original concept of safe, it made no sense in a world where safes were becoming independent funding cycles. Thus, the “old” pro-rata right is removed from the new safe, but we have a new model letter (optional) that offers the investor a proportional right in the preferential financing of Series A on the basis of the converted safe property of the investor, which is now much more transparent. Whether a start-up and an investor enter the letter with a safe will now be a choice that the parties will choose, and this may depend on a large number of factors. Factors to consider can (among other things) the amount of the safe purchase and the amount of future dilution that proportional duty can cause to the founders – an amount that can now be predicted with much greater accuracy if post-money safes are used. Unlike the converted debt, there is no debt with a SAFE. There is also no maturity date, which means that investors have to wait indefinitely before they can get their hands on the equity they have purchased, if they do.

SAFE investors take the biggest or most of the risk because there is no guarantee of participation in the company. An investor exchanges money for the hope that a transformational event will occur. In addition, a SAFE may be on hold indefinitely, which would prevent the investor from making a profit from the investment. Since FASCs should only be converted in the event of specific events, an investor should analyze the risk that events will not occur in light of the company`s circumstances. If an entity generates enough capital not to require additional capital financing cycles, the amount invested under SAFE can never be converted into equity. Our first safe was a “pre-money” safe, because at the time of its launch, startups collected smaller sums of money before collecting a funding cycle (typically a Preferred Stock Round Series). The safe was a quick and simple way to get the first money into the business, and the concept was that safe owners were only early investors in this future price cycle. But fundraising, staged early on, grew in the years following the introduction of the initial safe, and now startups are raising far more money than the first “seeds” funding cycle. While safes are used for these seed rounds, these towers are really better regarded as totally separate financing, instead of turning “bridges” into subsequent price cycles.

In addition to the absence of an valuation requirement, such as convertible bonds, safe deal terms may include valuation caps and share price discounts to give equity investors (CFs) a lower price per share than subsequent investors or venture capitalists in this liquidity event. This is fair, because previous investors take more risks than subsequent investors to pursue the same equity.