The author tried to create an agreement by intersecting a plural “incident” and a “do not give in”. This error is natural because “incidents” appear where we often expect the subject, just before the verb. However, “incidents” is actually part of a prepositional sentence that modifies an earlier word, “nature,” and the word should match that verb: the subject and verb are the most important elements of a sentence. The relationship between the subject and the verb depends on two themes: the person and the number. The verb of a sentence must match the subject in terms of person and number. Sometimes nouns take on strange shapes and can make us think that they are plural when they are really singular and vice versa. See the section on plural forms of names and the section on collective names for additional help. Words like glasses, pants, pliers, and scissors are considered plural (and require plural verbs), unless the pair of sentences is preceded by them (in this case, the pair of words becomes subject). On the other hand, there is an indeterminate pronoun, none that can be either singular or plural; It doesn`t matter if you use a singular or a plural plate, unless something else in the sentence determines its number. (Writers usually don`t think of anyone not to mean just any one, and choose a plural verb, as in “No engine works,” but if something else causes us not to consider any as one, we want a singular verb, as in “None of the foods are fresh.”) Pronouns are neither singular nor singular and require singular seditions, although they seem, in some way, to relate to two things. The subject number can be singular and plural. The verb must be singular when the subject is singular, and the verb must be plural when the subject is plural.

Although the topic has two elements, “Citizens` Rights Office” and “Human Rights Commission”, they have no additional quality; See “a few words you may not know are crazy,” above for a discussion of words like “ni.” However, a plural verb is appropriate when the part of the compound subject closest to the verb is plural. A few examples illustrate this point: so be it. . . Or not. . nor, or, and again take two names before and after them. Names placed after these conjunctions are considered subjects of the sentence.

Nouns that are placed before words or and again, have no influence on verbs. Basic principle: singular subjects need singular verbs; Plural subjects need plural abdelle. My brother is a nutritionist. My sisters are mathematicians. Rule 5a. Sometimes the subject is separated from the verb by words like with, as well as, next to it, not, etc. These words and phrases are not part of the topic. Ignore them and use a singular if the subject is singular. 9. If the subjects are the two singular and are connected by the words “or”, “ni”, ni”, “soit” or “not only/but also”, the verb is singular. Some names are always singularly and indeterminate.

When these subjects become subjects, they always accept singular verbs. Keys: subject = yellow, bold; verb = green, emphasize Although “Son” would accept a plural verb under normal circumstances, the author understood in this case that “Son of the Revolution” is a proper noun that refers to an organization as a whole, and not to several specific threads. . . .