In its initial phase, the Council authorises the European Commission to negotiate a new trade agreement on behalf of the EU. This requires a “negotiating mandate.” With the appropriate authorization, the Commission adopts negotiating guidelines that include the objectives, scope and possible timelines of the negotiations. In June 2018, the European Council stressed the need to maintain and deepen the rules-based multilateral system, amid growing trade tensions around the world. [2] trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2018/october/tradoc_157468.pdf 2019, the European Union and Vietnam have concluded a free trade agreement. The trade agreement includes a number of goods and services. The agreements set significant tariff reductions for food and beverage products, as well as the removal of a number of non-tariff barriers. The agreement also contains obligations on international workers` rights and protection, global environmental agreements and human rights. The report complements these relatively intuitive observations with fairly comprehensive data and case studies. For example, agricultural trade between the EU and Mexico has continued to grow throughout the free trade agreement, but outside the high-end market, for example, French wine exporters have not increased their market share.

One reason is that the common language and historical and cultural ties with Spain, Chile and Argentina are more compatible with Mexican consumers in terms of marketing and preferences. The other is access to distribution channels. French exporters are relatively small and fragmented compared, for example, to large Australian exporters, so they have not been able to market and distribute as effectively in Mexico. The European Court of Justice has ruled that the provisions relating to arbitration between the investor state (including a special tribunal under some free trade agreements) fall within the shared jurisdiction between the European Union and its Member States and that, for this reason, their ratification should be authorised by both the EU and each of the 28 Member States. [82] Trade agreements differ according to their content: first, the Commission confirms its strong pro-trade policy, which is underpinned by the following economic reality. That the EU is the largest exporter of agri-food products, with exports of 129 billion euros in 2015. These export results were determined by EU agricultural policy, technological progress and trade policy. Over the next ten years, the European Commission estimates that 90% of the additional food demand will be produced outside the EU. The Commission therefore expects it to continue its support for free trade agreements. The EU has preferential trade agreements with around 70 countries around the world. [1] These countries account for almost 32% of the EU`s foreign trade.

[2] The European Union negotiates free trade agreements on behalf of all its member states, as EU Member States have granted “exclusive jurisdiction” to conclude trade agreements. Nevertheless, the governments of the Member States control every step of the process (through the Council of the European Union, whose members are the national ministers of each national government). He defined the main principles that will now strengthen the Council`s approach to trade negotiations. In this context, although the report deals broadly with agricultural trade, it focuses on three specific EU free trade agreements with Mexico (2000), Switzerland (2002 and 2005) and South Korea (2011). Mexico is one of the earlier, more fundamental free trade agreements focused on reducing tariffs and quotas. Switzerland, the largest neighbouring trading partner for food and agricultural products. And South Korea, one of the EU`s most ambitious and comprehensive free trade agreements. There are a number of negotiations with countries in the hope that a future free trade agreement can be concluded. Australia, New Zealand and Mercosur (Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay) The EU recently published a detailed review of “the impact of